Historic Change in General Solicitation Law That Goes Into Effect Monday


jobs_actAn 80-year-old ban that has prevented private companies from publicly advertising their efforts to raise funds will lift on Monday.

If you are an entrepreneur struggling to find investors, that may be very good news. But hold the champagne for now.

What this historic change in general solicitation law really means is that if you are an entrepreneur looking to raise money from investors, you might want to spend some quality time with a lawyer before you go shouting it from the rooftops.

That’s because the Securities and Exchange Commission is expected on Monday to release further guidance on how it will regulate the new law – guidance that may determine how much the change will ultimately end up benefiting entrepreneurs.

“The proposed rules are absolutely critical to determining whether this will be successful or not. They have the potential to dramatically reduce the ability of companies to take advantage of this,” says Rory Eakin, co-founder of CircleUp, an online portal that connects consumer-product entrepreneurs with accredited investors. If the SEC requires companies to file excessive amounts of paperwork, many entrepreneurs may choose to not take advantage of the rule change, says Eakin.

2. Only accredited investors can actually purchase equity in a private company. While the lift of the ban means that entrepreneurs can tell the world that they are raising money, it’s still only accredited investors who are able to make investments, explains Jay Kalish, general counsel at the equity crowdfunding platform, OurCrowd, on a conference call with reporters and investors earlier this week.

In the U.S., an accredited investor has to have $200,000 in annual income over the past two years and be able to prove a reasonable expectation that he or she will maintain such an income during the current year, or $1 million in net worth, not including the value of his or her primary home. Also, anyone with a history of fraud or a felon, a so-called “bad actor,” will not be able to participate.

3. Your mom, grandma and sister will all start to see more advertisements from startups, even if they aren’t accredited investors. While only accredited investors will be able to purchase private company stock, everyone is going to see more advertisements. “For the non-accredited investor, the regular consumer, you can’t stop what is being publicly put in your face, right? Just by virtue of being a consumer of media and just a consumer, period, you will be messaged, too, and that is different than before. It used to be that the SEC prevented you from seeing these sorts of things,” says Mittal. “There is a whole new type of messaging that regular people will be exposed to.”

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About Stephen G. Barr, Group Publisher

Author, Syndicated Columnist, Editor In-Chief and Group Publisher at SGB Media Group, a social media marketing firm specializing in digital media content production, publishing, affiliate marketing, public relations and advertising. Over 25 years experience in retailing, advertising, website & online forum development, niche social networking, affiliate marketing, search optimization, branding and identity, site location, non-profit fund raising. Event planning, promotion, production and MC/Host at public events. Author, Editor & Publisher of 35 syndicated, digital publications utilizing multiple digital distribution channels in conjunction with launching and administrating national advertising campaigns for major Fortune 500 advertisers in partnership with Google, Ning, Facebook, Myspace, Yahoo, DoubleClick, LinkShare, PepperJam and other industry leading third party affiliate networks. Product development team member from conception to launch on many websites, tangible goods and organizational structure for start ups. Specialties: Public relations, retailing, advertising, website & online forum development, niche social networking, blogging, email campaigns, affiliate/performance marketing, search optimization, branding and identity, site location, event production & promotion, non-profit fund raising and tasteful, responsible adult content publishing. An internationally recognized and read social media columnist & pundit on The Examiner, Associate Content, Vator.tv, X-Biz.net and Technorati and his own affiliated sites.
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One Response to Historic Change in General Solicitation Law That Goes Into Effect Monday

  1. Pingback: SEC Extends Comment Period for Section 506 Reg D Advertising Rules « The Crowd Funding Times™

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