Entrepreneurs hope to build residential real estate empire through crowdfunding

rop-holdfolio-041315-2colJacob Blackett and Sterling White sit at the intersection of crowdfunding and residential real estate with their 6-month-old firm, Holdfolio. The 24-year-olds buy rental houses. In the coming months, they plan to bundle them and sell investors equity stakes in the portfolio through a Web-based platform. Investor returns will come in the form of rental income and gains from property sales. The company so far has few—if any—direct competitors.

Traditionally, investors in this space have needed loans or a lot of cash, as well as a property-management strategy. Holdfolio’s founders said their soon-to-launch platform will allow accredited investors to invest in real estate with as little as $5,000 while the company handles leasing and maintenance.

“We’re trying to create passive income through holdings,” said Blackett, who said he’s sold more than 500 rental properties since age 18.

“I just realized that the best way for someone to invest in real estate is not by going out and owning a piece of property themselves. The best way is to partner with successful, full-time real estate investors.”

Crowdfunding has been around for years, and returns on investment have largely come in the form of one-time rewards like T-shirts or a newly launched product.

Debt and equity crowdfunding have taken off since the 2012 JOBS Act loosened federal securities laws, and real estate firms are among the companies increasingly tapping online investor pools for financing.

Jordan Fishfeld, CEO of Chicago-based commercial real estate crowdfunding platform PeerRealty, said crowdfunding is changing how people invest in real estate and Holdfolio appears to have a good shot at success in the nascent space.

Continued Here

Advertisements

Colorado Proposes Crowdfunding Act

Flag-of-ColoradoColorado this week became the latest state to attempt to speed up the process for ordinary residents to invest in a private start-up company.

The proposed Colorado Crowdfunding Act would open up the potential pool of investors that start-ups can approach for funding.

By law, only accredited investors can buy stock in a private company today, and such investors must make at least $200,000 annually and have a $1 million net worth.

The bill allows any Colorado resident to invest up to $5,000 in a company without the need for accreditation.

“The challenge right now with a Colorado company trying to raise money is if they want to get outside investors, wealthy investors or venture capitalists, they have to go through such a labyrinth of securities laws and lawyers,” said bill sponsor Rep. Dan Pabon, D-Denver, during a press conference Wednesday. “The overwhelming cost and burden is on that particular business.”

Pabon’s bill would require the company and investor to be based in the state and that 80 percent of the proceeds of investment is spent here. House Bill 1246, introduced Tuesday, limits it to companies raising $1 million — or $2 million if they provide audited financial statements.

Continue

RetireAmerica.com Announces Launch

retire-logo-with.com_

2013 /PRNewswire/ — RetireAmerica.com announced today the launch of its web-based capital protected equity crowdfunding portal. The launch is in beta form and is intended to become fully functional by year-end. Empowering Entrepreneurs, Protecting Investors, Creating Jobs. RetireAmerica.com (www.retireamerica.com) announced today the launch of its crowdfunding portal which will offer investors the opportunity to make equity investments in early stage companies through its unique financing structure that combines capital protection with an equity investment. Initially, investments on the platform will be limited to accredited investors, but will be expanded to non-accredited eligible investors following full implementation of Title III of the JOBS Act.

Steve Colmar, RetireAmerica.com’s CEO stated, “Everyone knows that early stage investing is risky. Our mission has been to develop a product that opens up investment opportunities in early stage companies to investors who want to minimize their risk of loss. And now the crowdfunding revolution has arrived, making equity investments in early-stage companies available to countless new investors through groundbreaking social media outlets or portals. But despite its transformational influence on capital markets, crowdfunding hasn’t solved how to reduce the risk of loss of capital in early stage investments. The RetireAmerica.com product addresses this problem through our unique capital protected structure. Our protection feature allows the investor to protect some or all of his or her investment, and, in some cases, to redeploy non-risk capital at the investor’s discretion by converting it into additional equity.”

“We believe our capital protected product, with its unique conversion feature, is advantageous for both parties to the investment equation. For the entrepreneur, it provides a ready pool of capital to further their growth plans. And for the investor, it provides an opportunity to protect capital and to make additional incremental investments if and when it suits their individual risk profile.”

For More information, go to http://www.retireamerica.com

About RetireAmerica.com
RetireAmerica.com is an Austin Texas based company. Developed by Business Ventures Corp. of Austin, TX and Santa Barbara, CA. Accredited investors interested in RetireAmerica.com’s capital protected investments are invited to visit http://www.retireamerica.com and register as users of the site. Registration is free, giving investors access to our investment opportunities and important updates regarding RetireAmerica.com. Entrepreneurs with companies looking for capital are encouraged to submit their company for consideration.

SOURCE RetireAmerica.com

RELATED LINKS
http://www.retireamerica.com

 

SEC Extends Comment Period for Section 506 Reg D Advertising Rules

Washington, DC – The Securities and Exchange Commission extended the public comment period for proposed, new rules that would govern how businesses can advertise equity offerings to accredited investors under Rule 506 Regulation D.

SEC

SEC

On July 10, 2013, the SEC issued rules that would lift the ban against general solicitations for Rule 506 Regulation D offering as mandated by Title II of the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act.  The new rules lifted the ban effective September 23, 2013; however, the SEC also proposed for public comment additional rules that would regulate general advertising for Rule 506 offerings.

The comment period for the new rules closed on September 23, 2013, but on September 27, 2013, the SEC said it will reopen the public comment period.

Rule 506 exempts business from registering their securities with the SEC if they are offering and selling their equity only to “accredited investors” under Rule 501 of Regulation D. On July 10, 2013, the SEC also proposed, newadditional rules for public comment that would add restrictions to general solicitations.  The SEC’s new proposals would:

1.   Require the filing of a Form D no later than 15 days in advance of a general solicitation followed by a closing Form D amendment 20 days after the Rule 506 offering. The Crowdfund Intermediary Regulatory Advocates (CFIRA) commented to the SEC that the proposal is  ”inconsistent with the principles of the JOBS Act for general solicitation and advertising.”

2.  Require the placement of  a legend — that is, a disclaimer that the advertising is offering a private placement of securities — with any advertising. CFIRA noted that such a proposal would make it impossible to use services such as Twitter to make an offering.

Continue Reading HERE

 

Historic Change in General Solicitation Law That Goes Into Effect Monday

jobs_actAn 80-year-old ban that has prevented private companies from publicly advertising their efforts to raise funds will lift on Monday.

If you are an entrepreneur struggling to find investors, that may be very good news. But hold the champagne for now.

What this historic change in general solicitation law really means is that if you are an entrepreneur looking to raise money from investors, you might want to spend some quality time with a lawyer before you go shouting it from the rooftops.

That’s because the Securities and Exchange Commission is expected on Monday to release further guidance on how it will regulate the new law – guidance that may determine how much the change will ultimately end up benefiting entrepreneurs.

“The proposed rules are absolutely critical to determining whether this will be successful or not. They have the potential to dramatically reduce the ability of companies to take advantage of this,” says Rory Eakin, co-founder of CircleUp, an online portal that connects consumer-product entrepreneurs with accredited investors. If the SEC requires companies to file excessive amounts of paperwork, many entrepreneurs may choose to not take advantage of the rule change, says Eakin.

2. Only accredited investors can actually purchase equity in a private company. While the lift of the ban means that entrepreneurs can tell the world that they are raising money, it’s still only accredited investors who are able to make investments, explains Jay Kalish, general counsel at the equity crowdfunding platform, OurCrowd, on a conference call with reporters and investors earlier this week.

In the U.S., an accredited investor has to have $200,000 in annual income over the past two years and be able to prove a reasonable expectation that he or she will maintain such an income during the current year, or $1 million in net worth, not including the value of his or her primary home. Also, anyone with a history of fraud or a felon, a so-called “bad actor,” will not be able to participate.

3. Your mom, grandma and sister will all start to see more advertisements from startups, even if they aren’t accredited investors. While only accredited investors will be able to purchase private company stock, everyone is going to see more advertisements. “For the non-accredited investor, the regular consumer, you can’t stop what is being publicly put in your face, right? Just by virtue of being a consumer of media and just a consumer, period, you will be messaged, too, and that is different than before. It used to be that the SEC prevented you from seeing these sorts of things,” says Mittal. “There is a whole new type of messaging that regular people will be exposed to.”

Continue Reading

CrowdPad.co’s Release Postponed – Developers Warn Real Estate Crowfunding Investors

1174769_672963946065630_1697156509_n

English: A frame from a screencast from the US...
English: A frame from a screencast from the US House Financial Committee full committee hearing “An Examination of the Extraordinary Efforts by the Federal Reserve Bank to Provide Liquidity in the Current Financial Crisis which took place Tuesday, February 10, 2009, 1:00pm, 2128 Rayburn House Office Building. The frame shows Chairmen Ben Bernanke responding to a question posited by John E. Sweeney Full Committee (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We’ve decided to hold of the launch of this real estate crowdfunding platform due to inherent legal difficulties and risks involved in crowdfunding real estate. We will revisit this later after the SEC rulings roll out and the kinks are worked out on existing sites; however, we see significant investment risk and an unacceptable (to us) litigation risk in all existing real estate crowdfunding platforms, at least a great deal more than we are willing to expose our client’s investment capital to. We will launch The Aria Group’s investment portal for accredited investors next week. It is unknown at this time if we will release the crowdfunding portal of non-accredited investors. We wish to err to the side of caution and not run into the already crowded space with anything less than our ability to offer investors a fully secure, predictable and litigation proof investment vehicle. Although recent market indicators predict a rebounding market yesterday’s meeting of The Federal Reserve’s Open Market Committee posed some significant unanswered questions that we at CrowdPad would like to see resolved which won’t happen until sometime after Fed Chairman Bernanke‘s successor takes the reins at the end of January 2014. We feel that the loss of traction by waiting until February will be far outweighed by our ability to continue to monitor existing real estate crowdfunding platform performance following the SEC’s release of the new regulations for several months and also allowing for the transition to Bernake’s successor and the release and analysis of the upcoming holiday shopping indicators.

We will instead opening our closed investment portal for accredited investors only within the next few weeks on our parent corp’s website at The Aria Group. We take the integrity and security of our client’s investments very seriously and simply do not wish to get caught up in the current frenzy to rush to market an investment platform which we see as having a higher than acceptable risk factor for our clients.ARIALogoSpec1

Final Crowdfunding Rules Not Likely Until Late 2014

Seal of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commi...
Seal of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Final crowdfunding rules are not likely to be in place until late 2014 because the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority and the Securities and Exchange Commission need to take more action, according to a blog on corporate and securities regulation.

TheCorporateCounsel.net blog said today that Finra still needs to create a regulatory system for funding portals and the SEC is still developing rules.

“As a result, the ability to do exempt crowdfunding offerings remains limited, except that many are anticipating the ability to do more accredited investor-only crowdfunding offerings once general solicitation is permitted under Rule 506 after the September 23, 2013, effective date of those JOBS Act mandated rule changes,” the authors noted.

TheCorporateCounsel.net added the SEC’s proposed amendments to Regulation D and Form D to have investor safeguards when the general solicitation ban is lifted is drawing fire as not being faithful to the JOBS act’s goal of promoting capital formation.

The SEC’s crowdfunding rules will set the standards for exempt crowdfunding offerings to non-accredited investors, subject to a $1 million cap over a rolling 12-month period and dollar limits on an investor’s financial position.

TheCorporateCounsel.net is an educational service that provides guidance on legal issues involving corporate and securities regulation and corporate governance practices.

Source: fa-mag.com – Ted Knutson
Link: http://www.fa-mag.com/news/final-crowdfunding-rules-not-likely-until-late-2014-15305.html