Fund dreamer – Crowdfunding for Women & Diversity Groups

I stumbled on this new nonprofit crowdfunding platform designed for women and diversity groups. Their site says:

“Fund Dreamer Inc. is a non-profit organization located in Los Angeles, CA. We leverage state of the art social media technologies to reach wider donor and investor base for making your campaign successful.”

A Funding Revolution   Fund Dreamer

 

 

Specialties

Crowd Funding, Women Entrepreneurship, Social Media Amplification, Crowd Sourcing, Minority Entrepreneurship

  • Website

    http://www.funddreamer.com

  • Industry

    Financial Services

  • Type

    Public Company

  • Headquarters

    1444 S Point View Los Angeles, CA90035 United States

  • Company Size

    1-10 employees

  • Founded

    2012

 

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Crowdtilt Launches Crowdfunding API

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Since launching in February, Y Combinator grad Crowdtilt has been on a mission to become the easiest way for friends and groups of people to raise money for any cause. Last month, the group-funding platform added deeper support for non-profits and charitable fundraising initiatives by enabling users to make tax-deductible donations to 501(c)(3) organizations and receive auto-generated tax-deductible receipts.

The startup has been looking for business development opportunities and ways to increase its reach, both among non-profits and startups. Crowdtilt is today adding another piece to its customer acquisition strategy with the (beta) launch of its API. With its new API in place, Crowdtilt now enables third-party developers and businesses to quickly tap into its group-payment capabilities.

Simply put, the startup’s API will provide an off-the-shelf solution to handle group payments, allowing developers to choose from a handful of popular payment processors, like Stripe, Balanced and Braintree, integrating that technology into their apps and products. The API also provides collaboration tools like comments, updates and messaging, enabling businesses to offer a group payment option during checkout, a pre-sales commerce option, as well as the ability to develop a social, crowdfunding application — either for single projects, like Lockitron, or multi-project models, a la Kickstarter.

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A Comparative Look at Kickstarter, Indiegogo and Razoo

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Buzzwords and catchphrases evolve when there is some cool opportunity for success. People get excited, and sometimes we realize that “easy” success actually only works in very specific circumstances. One of today’s buzzwords is crowdfunding.

First, some definitions. This isn’t crowdsourcing, which is another popular buzzword. Crowdsourcing is creating something by dispersing the task of creating it to many people. It’s possible to crowdsource writing a book, for example. However, when people fund the work of a single editor who turns that crowdsourced content into a coherent narrative, that is crowdfunding. Crowdfunding is not the same thing as fundraising for ongoing operating support. Building a base of small donors and trying to get large amounts of money is an important, ongoing operational goal, but that’s just fundraising. There may be some new tools to do it, but it is as old as the nonprofit sector itself.

The closest parallel to the 20th century nonprofit world would probably be the capital campaign. Here, nonprofits would make requests for large goals on a fixed timeline, often to buy a fixed asset like a building. The old-style capital campaign has taken a beating in the post-2007 economy, as the primary way this was done relied on large-scale donations from small numbers of well-off individuals and institutions. Many of these took large portfolio hits five years ago and aren’t recovered to the point where they will make big investments again.

In contrast, crowdfunding takes the small-donor base and adds the one-time effort emphasis for specific, defined purposes. This is only practical if the cost of reaching donors is practically nil (there are typically no in-person visits from the president with a $10 glossy for your capital campaign in crowdfunding), and if you can reach a lot of them. If your nonprofit is going to reach a large enough base, you’ll probably need to rent some infrastructure. The big players are Kickstarter, Indiegogo and Razoo.

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